Showing all posts tagged 737overhead:

DIY Boeing 737 Overhead Panel - Part 7 - Connecting Toggle Switch with a Matrix

Using my GPIO expander boards, I could now assemble a stack of eight MCP23017s which would give me 16 x 8 = 128 inputs. This may sound like a lot, but when I counted the number of stuff I would need to connect for the 737 Overhead, it was quite limiting. So I spent a few weeks researching on options to increase the number of GPIOs further. Given that my toggle switches are only used for inputs, one common solution, is to multiplex a number of GPIOs together in a Matrix configuration. This is...

DIY Boeing 737 Overhead Panel - Part 6- Adding GPIOs

In part 5 I touched on some ideas about my overall architecture for interfacing the Flight Simulator with the Raspbery Pi. In this post I look into GPIOs, the basic mechanism by which the Raspberry Pi can communicate with the real world. GPIO stands for General-Purpose Input/Output ... and is a common feature found in most microcontrollers that is used to interface software with the real world of electronics. When used as an input, it allows the microcontroller to sense if an input signal is ...

DIY Boeing 737 Overhead Panel - Dedicated Power Supply

The overhead panel now has it's own dedicated power supply. It was previously powered by my bench power supply on my desk, but it's time to give it something permanent. So I got this 240VAC to 5VDC 5.5A power supply off lelong.com.my for MYR34 + MYR6 shipping. I ordered at it 3:30AM on Saturday morning, and it arrived on Tuesday morning, which is not bad considering it was the New Year's weekend and Monday was a public holiday. It's of the typical "industrial" design where you attach the AC ...

DIY Boeing 737 Overhead Panel - Progress Update 31 Dec 2016

I managed to get two panels of my Raspberry Pi powered DIY 737 Overhead Panel project working before year's end ... enough to power on the Auxiliary Power unit (APU), and switch the aircraft to draw power from it, turn on external lights ... and start the engines! This last bit features an engine starter knob that turns itself back to OFF once the engines are running, just like the real thing! It's taken me most of this year to get this far, and I'm still a long way off from completing the ...

DIY Boeing 737 Overhead Panel - Part 5 - Some Thoughts on Interfacing Electronics with X-Plane

Yes I haven't posted much on this for some time ... I've been busy with real work for a change, so there's been less time to devote to this hobby obsession, much less write about it. For those who've just tuned in, this project is about building a 737 Overhead Panel for my X-Plane Flight Simulator. You can read my earlier posts on this here. a 737 Overhead Panel (it's at the top of the flightdeck cockpit, over the pilot's heads) It's now time to give some thought to the electronics behin...

DIY Boeing 737 Overhead Panel - Part 4 - Little White Toggle Switch Caps

The 737 overhead panel has around 70 toggle switches. The ones I've used are readily available at most electronic stores and also on eBay, and are great for their cheap price -- you can get 10 pieces for around USD2 with free shipping. They do the job, even though they're not quite in the same league as the original switches -- which is acceptable if you're on a budget. The original switches come in two varieties, standard levers and "locking" levers. The locking variety require they the lev...

DIY Boeing 737 Overhead Panel - Part 3 - Moving Gauges

Although I had planned to work on the annunciator lights next, I was still waiting for some parts, so in the meantime, I started work on the overhead panel's moving gauges. The 737 overhead panel has a number of gauges with needle indicators. Earlier, when I made the panels, I had cut out circles into the panels wherever the gauges are, and so now it is time to work on the actual mechanics behind the gauge. I used 2mm acrylic (RM5 per sheet from Art Friend at The Curve shopping mall), as I...

DIY Boeing 737 Overhead Panel - Part 2 - Panel Faces

Having built a frame and a stand for the 737 Overhead Panel in Part 1, I now look at building the "face" of the individual panels. Most of this is heavily inspired by Peter of Build a Boeing's youtube videos. Choice of Material There are a number of materials that can be used to make the panels. The ideal material would be 3 mm white acrylic/plexiglass, painted with the panel colour and then run through a CNC mill to cut them to shape, cut and drill out holes, and then engrave the l...

DIY Boeing 737 Overhead Panel - Part 1 - Building the Structure

Having spent many hours on my X-Plane flight simulator, I've come to start using my displays only for the "outside view" from the cockpit. This means having the flight control instruments in hardware as much as possible. I've achieved this to some degree with the "glass cockpit" monitors I added a while back. However, when flying the 737 I still need to use the "virtual" overhead panel, so this was a good next target to move to hardware. You can buy fully functioning 737 overhead replicas in...